Venus and Mercury – 2015-05-06

Mercury

Mercury was at its greatest elongation for 2015 om May 6th at 21deg, so i decided to try to capture an image of it. Being low in the sky it’s hard to get a clear view through the murky unstable surface air. So i decided to capture the image just after sunset at 20:19edt when it was still relatively high. Mercury was not yet visible unaided, but it showed up well in the telescope. The sun had just set at 20:16 when i captured the image, so it was only 0.5deg below the horizon. Nautical dusk wasn’t until 21:31. The down side was the bright evening sky reduced contrast. Given it’s very difficult or unusual to resolve any surface details of Mercury in a backyard telescope, the lack of contrast wasn’t going to matter.

Mercury 2015-05-06, 20-19edt

Mercury 2015-05-06, 20-19edt, Monochrome

Being only 7.9″ in angular size, it is very difficult to resolve any surface details at the best of times. And being so low in the sky and taken only minutes after sunset, the unstable surface air and low contrast obscured what details might be obtainable. The only interesting feature then is the phase. Mercury is also grey, like the moon, so a colour image wouldn’t actually have any colour.

I used the Celestron HD11 with a 5x Powermate. The effective focal length is therefore 14,000mm at effectively f/50. I capture a 60sec AVI (movie) at a resolution of 640×480 at 30fps with a monochrome Point Grey Chameleon (no filters). That works out to 1792 frames. Using Autostakkert2, i selected the best 10% of the frames and stacked them into a single image. Further processing with PixInsight (wavelets and curves) sharpened up the edges to reveal a nice waxing crescent – but no surface detail.

The specs for Mercury that evening were:

  • Mag: +0.4
  • Size: 7.9 arcsec
  • Illumination: 38%
  • Azimuth: 286deg
  • Altitude: 18deg
  • Elongation from Sun: 21deg (at maximum)

I tried using a 35nm IR pass filter with the above setup, but at f/50, there wasn’t enough light. The advantage of using IR is it less affected by the turbulent air and the narrow bandwidth improves focus. A future project is to try the IR filter with the HD11 at prime focal length or with a 2x powermate.

Venus

Venus was at a greater elongation [from the sun] so i waited until 21:04edt to capture that image. The sun was now 7.5deg below the horizon and closer to nautical dusk (21:31).

Using the same technique above, i captured two 60sec AVIs and processed them with the same method. Then i combined the two resulting images which reduced some blotches.

Venus 2015-05-06, 21:04edt

Venus 2015-05-06, 21:04edt, Monochome

Venus is blanketed by a thick white cloud, but unlike Jupiter and Saturn, there is no colour or banding visible in white light. (I have seen some images in UV that do show some some cloud details.) So even though Venus is a reasonable 18arcsec in angular size, the only interesting feature is the phase.

The specs for Venus that evening were:

  • Mag: -4.14
  • Size: 18 arcsec
  • Illumination: 64%
  • Azimuth: 280deg
  • Altitude: 28deg
  • Elongation from Sun: 43deg (maximum is 45deg)

Venus and Mercury Comparison

Since i had the two images created with the same gear, i decided to display them side by side to show the relative angular sizes:

Venus and Mercury 2015-05-06

Venus and Mercury 2015-05-06

 

Examples of What Other People Can Do

While it’s difficult to get images that show any detail on either Mercury or Venus, it is possible to capture images using relatively modest ground based equipment (not billion dollar mountain top scope). The links below to Daniele Gasparri’s web site [external link] show some impressive images that have been acquired using a C14 combined with various filters.


Mercury by Daniele Gasparri [External Link}


Venus by Daniele Gasparri [External Link}